Cedar Walton

There have been many Cedar Walton records put out through the years and the three that he and his trio made during a Bologna concert in 1985 rank with his best. Are all easily recommended to straightahead jazz collectors
Scott Yanow, Allmusic

«One of the qualities of Cedar Walton is the ability to maintain clarity and calm in every situation in which he finds himself, controlling the sound with maturity and awareness, whether he himself is the author of the project or depends on other leaders. It is natural that in complete solitude, in the exclusive relationship between his mind and the keyboard, that calm and lucidity take a leap forward, precisely because they are free to fully adhere to the project. And it is precisely what is evident in this Blues For Myself, a monologue of great serenity but also of great interpretative value, with a Powellian influence that becomes acute, with that touch that becomes more and more precious as it offers a point of view of famous songs and in the moment it moves on one’s own compositions. Here, however, it is not Walton’s incisiveness that comes to the fore but his taste, the choice of notes, the depth of the pauses, the tension he manages to create in dialogues with himself, that sense of recollection, almost sacred, which makes his fingers move with feeling and expressive solidity, with disarming simplicity and a sense of great refinement». Blues for Myself
Mario Luzi, Musica Jazz

«Few pianists know how to wisely combine elegance and sound, the art of improvising and sensitivity to accompaniment. And just as few know how to be as eclectic as Cedar Walton. A trio that despite having a nominal leader in Walton – a pianist who never betrays the listener, with that post-Powellian-like style and refined harmonic sense – is nourished by the persuasive sparkle of Higgins, of those inimitable and light rhythmic breaths, of the airiness of his beat, as well as the support and pronounced dialogue of Williams, a musician that just keeps on growing. A great trio that wonderfully reflects the jazz continuum». The Trio, vol.1
Mario Luzi, Musica Jazz

«Two records by Cedar Walton and inevitably great emotions are ignited, The same ones that are felt every time his trio returns to perform in Italy. Indeed, these two live works, which follow the first, re-propose a roughly-tested repertoire (carefully selected standards, extremely interesting originals, an intense reinterpretation of Monk, and a thoughtful Bossanovan digression) completing a prestigious triptych. And at the same time they give full credit to a group that – in a field so beaten but also so particular as that of the trio, which always has to deal with great models – seems to have no rivals. What is striking above all is its expressive balance, propitiated as best one could by a moderately pushed and exquisitely multifaceted piano sound, always original in every harmonic, melodic and rhythmic detail, plus a percussion that has now risen to a real drumming model for reduced formations, plus a clean, simple, fluid bass contribution. The trio of Walton, Williams, Higgins offers pushing music, curated in the slightest nuance: after all, the fragrance and the absence of routine, despite the repetitiveness of the repertoire (one never slips into a jam atmosphere, much less a mainstream one), testify to a very deep and heartfelt commitment. You have to go back to the Bud Powell trio of the Blue Note period or to the Bill Evans trios, in my opinion, to find valid feedback and points of reference. The Trio, vol.2/3
Bruno Schiozzi, Musica Jazz

«One of the qualities of Cedar Walton is the ability to maintain clarity and calm in every situation in which he finds himself, controlling the sound with maturity and awareness, whether he himself is the author of the project or depends on other leaders. It is natural that in complete solitude, in the exclusive relationship between his mind and the keyboard, that calm and lucidity take a leap forward, precisely because they are free to fully adhere to the project. And it is precisely what is evident in this Blues For Myself, a monologue of great serenity but also of great interpretative value, with a Powellian influence that becomes acute, with that touch that becomes more and more precious as it offers a point of view of famous songs and in the moment it moves on one’s own compositions. Here, however, it is not Walton’s incisiveness that comes to the fore but his taste, the choice of notes, the depth of the pauses, the tension he manages to create in dialogues with himself, that sense of recollection, almost sacred, which makes his fingers move with feeling and expressive solidity, with disarming simplicity and a sense of great refinement». Blues for Myself
Mario Luzi, Musica Jazz

«Few pianists know how to wisely combine elegance and sound, the art of improvising and sensitivity to accompaniment. And just as few know how to be as eclectic as Cedar Walton. A trio that despite having a nominal leader in Walton – a pianist who never betrays the listener, with that post-Powellian-like style and refined harmonic sense – is nourished by the persuasive sparkle of Higgins, of those inimitable and light rhythmic breaths, of the airiness of his beat, as well as the support and pronounced dialogue of Williams, a musician that just keeps on growing. A great trio that wonderfully reflects the jazz continuum». The Trio, vol.1
Mario Luzi, Musica Jazz

«Two records by Cedar Walton and inevitably great emotions are ignited, The same ones that are felt every time his trio returns to perform in Italy. Indeed, these two live works, which follow the first, re-propose a roughly-tested repertoire (carefully selected standards, extremely interesting originals, an intense reinterpretation of Monk, and a thoughtful Bossanovan digression) completing a prestigious triptych. And at the same time they give full credit to a group that – in a field so beaten but also so particular as that of the trio, which always has to deal with great models – seems to have no rivals. What is striking above all is its expressive balance, propitiated as best one could by a moderately pushed and exquisitely multifaceted piano sound, always original in every harmonic, melodic and rhythmic detail, plus a percussion that has now risen to a real drumming model for reduced formations, plus a clean, simple, fluid bass contribution. The trio of Walton, Williams, Higgins offers pushing music, curated in the slightest nuance: after all, the fragrance and the absence of routine, despite the repetitiveness of the repertoire (one never slips into a jam atmosphere, much less a mainstream one), testify to a very deep and heartfelt commitment. You have to go back to the Bud Powell trio of the Blue Note period or to the Bill Evans trios, in my opinion, to find valid feedback and points of reference. The Trio, vol.2/3
Bruno Schiozzi, Musica Jazz